Which type of chain binder should I use?

Chain binder also known as a load binder, these two terms are used interchangeably. Chain binders are tools used to bind, clamp, anchor or tie down large cargo loads for transport. There are two basic types of chain binders – lever binders and ratchet binders.

 

Ratchet Binder

Also called a ratchet chain or ratchet load binder, this device uses a ratcheting action to tension chain and secure cargo. A ratchet binder consists of a ratchet handle and two tension hooks on each end.

When using a ratchet binder, the lever and screw work together and increase the force manually applied to the tie-down assembly. The result is that it takes much less pulling force on the handle to apply tension than you would need with a lever binder.

Ratchets also allow for slower, steadier loading and unloading of forces. This reduces any undue stress or strain on your body. Since ratchet binders are designed with a gear, handle, pawl and end fittings, they will not store up as much energy in the handle as a lever binder will.

Another advantage of ratchet binders is that take-up is safer. The take-up distance of a ratchet binder is typically eight to ten inches – twice that of a lever binder. While take up with a ratchet binder may take a few extra minutes, it is more controlled and ultimately a safer process.

Lever Binder

Also called a snap binder, lever chain or lever load binder. Chain-tensioning device uses a leverage action to tighten and secure loads. With a tension hook on each end, this binder requires more strength to tighten than ratchet binders.

A lever binder is made up of a simple machine, a lever, with a tension hook on each end. The lever is used to increase the force applied to a tie down. The lever is hinged and takes up the slack by pulling on one end of the tension hook and will lock itself after a 180-degree rotation of the lever around the hinge. Some of the advantages of choosing a lever-type binder include: Easy installation, Fewer moving parts (less maintenance).

 

Routinely check load binders for wear, bending, cracks, nicks, or gouges. If bending or cracks are present – Do not use load binder.

Routinely lubricate pivot and swivel points of Lever Binders, and pawl part and screw threads of Ratchet Binders to extend product life and reduce friction wear.

 

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